Skip to main content

Carole Boston Weatherford

Biography

Carole Boston Weatherford

The daughter of educators, award-winning poet Carole Boston Weatherford began writing in first grade.  Today she is the author of numerous books, including the Carter G. Woodson award winning title, The Sound That Jazz Makes and most recently, Dear Mr. Rosenwald.   Her writing covers such topics as jazz and  photography, as well as the slavery, reconstruction and Jim Crow eras. When she's not traveling or visiting museums, Carole is mining the past for family stories, fading traditions and forgotten struggles. Coming from a family of educators, she has a passion for rescuing events and figures from obscurity by documenting American history.

Carole Boston Weatherford

Books by Carole Boston Weatherford

Written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by Sarah Green. - Children's 5-8, History

Before she raised her lens to take her most iconic photo, Dorothea Lange took photos of the downtrodden from bankers in once-fine suits waiting in breadlines, to former slaves, to the homeless sleeping on sidewalks. A case of polio had left her with a limp and sympathetic to those less fortunate. Traveling across the United States, documenting with her camera and her fieldbook those most affected by the stock market crash, she found the face of the Great Depression.

Written by Carole Boston Weatherford with illustrations by Jeffery Boston Weatherford - Children's 9-12, Children's Nonfiction, History, Military, Nonfiction, Poetry

Award-winning author Carole Boston Weatherford’s innovative history in verse celebrates the story of the Tuskegee Airmen: pioneering African-American pilots who triumphed in the skies and past the color barrier. From training days in Alabama to combat on the front lines in Europe, this is the story of the Tuskegee Airmen, the groundbreaking African-American pilots of World War II. In vibrant second-person poems, Carole Boston Weatherford teams up for the first time with her son, artist Jeffery Weatherford, in a powerful and inspiring book that allows readers to fly, too.

Written by Carole Boston Weatherford with illustrations by R. Gregory Christie - Children's Nonfiction, History, Human Rights, Prejudice , Racism

As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when at least for half a day they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. Here they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles and their oppression. This story chronicles slaves' duties each day, from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday, and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo Square.

written by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Ekua Holmes - Children's 10-12

Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson’s interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Featuring vibrant mixed-media art full of intricate detail, Voice of Freedom celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer’s life and legacy with a message of hope, determination and strength.

Written by Carole Boston Weatherford with illustrations by Jamey Christoph. - African American Interest, Art, Art History, Children's, Children's Nonfiction, History, Nonfiction, Photography, Picture

Gordon Parks is most famous for being the first black director in Hollywood. But before he made movies and wrote books, he was a poor African American looking for work. When he bought a camera, his life changed forever. He taught himself how to take pictures and before long, people noticed. His success as a fashion photographer landed him a job working for the government. In Washington DC, Gordon went looking for a subject, but what he found was segregation. Gordon wanted to take a stand against the racism he observed. With his camera in hand, he found a way. Told through lyrical verse and atmospheric art, this is the story of how, with a single photograph, a self-taught artist got America to take notice.