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Trailblazers: 33 in Science Who Changed the World

Review

Trailblazers: 33 in Science Who Changed the World

Did you know windshield wipers were invented by a woman (Mary Anderson); Maria Mitchell was not only the first American to spot a comet in the skies, she was the woman to do so; or that Emil von Behring won a Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1901 for her work on diphtheria? I didn't either until I read TRAILBLAZERS.

"The author did a lot work in researching these women. This is evidenced by the extensive notes section, as well as the bibliography, at the end of the book."

Author Rachel Swaby gives readers a glimpse into the lives of 33 fascinating women, all of whom made noteworthy contributions to science. The women came from several countries: America, Great Britain, Australia, Italy, Germany, France, Canada and Russia. The book is divided into four sections, dealing different branches of science: Technology and Inventions, The Earth and Stars, Health and Medicine, and Biology.

With profiles of 33 women, each is given only a few pages, highlighting their contributions to a particular field. Readers interested in learning more about any of the women can find more information by checking the sources the author used. These sources are listed in the bibliography.

I was familiar with the names of only a few of the women profiled in this book. I had never heard of most of them. The author did a lot work in researching these women. This is evidenced by the extensive Notes section, as well as the Bibliography, at the end of the book.

There are no pictures of any of the women profiled in this book. While photos may not be necessary, I would have liked to see some included in the text.

Reviewed by Christine M. Irvin on October 24, 2016

Trailblazers: 33 in Science Who Changed the World
by Rachel Swaby