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Jason Reynolds

Biography

Jason Reynolds

Jason Reynolds is crazy. About stories. He is a New York Times bestselling author, a National Book Award Honoree, a Kirkus Award winner, a Walter Dean Myers Award winner, an NAACP Image Award Winner, and the recipient of multiple Coretta Scott King honors. His debut novel was WHEN I WAS THE GREATEST and was followed by BOY IN THE BLACK SUIT and ALL AMERICAN BOYS (cowritten with Brendan Kiely); AS BRAVE AS YOU; JUMP ANYWAY; and the first two books in the Track series, GHOST and PATINA.

Jason Reynolds

Books by Jason Reynolds

by Jason Reynolds - African American Interest, Children's, Children's 8-12, Coming of Age, Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Sports, Youth Fiction

Patina, or Patty, runs like a flash. She runs to escape the taunts from the kids at the fancy-schmancy new school she’s been sent to since she and her little sister had to stop living with their mom. She runs from the reason WHY she’s not able to live with her “real” mom any more: her mom has The Sugar, and Patty is terrified that the disease will kill her. But can you ever really run away from any of this? As the stress builds up, it’s building up a pretty bad attitude as well. Coach won’t tolerate bad attitude, and now he wants Patty to run relay…where you have to depend on other people? How’s she going to do THAT?

by Jason Reynolds - Children's 10+, Children's 10-14, Fiction, Friendship, Sports

Ghost. Lu. Patina. Sunny. Four kids from wildly different backgrounds with personalities that are explosive when they clash. But they are also four kids chosen for an elite middle school track team --- a team that could qualify them for the Junior Olympics if they can get their acts together. They all have a lot to lose, but they also have a lot to prove, not only to each other, but to themselves.

by Jason Reynolds - Children's, Children's 10+, Family, Fiction, Youth Fiction

Genie’s summer is full of surprises. The first is that he and his big brother, Ernie, are leaving Brooklyn to spend the summer with their grandparents --- in the COUNTRY! The second surprise comes when Genie figures out that their grandfather is blind. Genie thinks Grandpop must be the bravest guy he’s ever known, but then Ernie lets him down in the bravery department. It’s his fourteenth birthday, and, Grandpop says to become a man, you have to learn how to shoot a gun. Genie thinks that is AWESOME until he realizes Ernie has no interest in learning how to shoot. Dumbfounded by Ernie’s reluctance, Genie is left to wonder --- is bravery and becoming a man only about proving something, or is it just as important to own up to what you won’t do?