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I Represent Sean Rosen

Review

I Represent Sean Rosen

Sean Rosen has a great idea that will change the entertainment industry that will affect TV, movies, theaters and video games. He’s willing to sell the idea for 10 million dollars (although he may settle for a bit less.) But, before he can peddle his idea to the major entertainment companies, he has to get someone to represent him.

"In the process of telling a good story, author Jeff Baron throws in lots of movie industry buzz words such as options, screen plays, production rights, first writer, publishing rights, etc., educating, as well as entertaining, the reader."

That’s a problem because he doesn’t know anyone in the entertainment industry. And he has no entertainment experience other than being onstage for his high school French class's production and making podcasts featuring area businesses, which he produces, edits and posts online. To make matters worse, Sean doesn’t live anywhere near New York or Hollywood where the big entertainment companies are, and he’s only 13 years old. That should be enough to stop him from trying, but it isn’t and it doesn’t.

Sean sends a letter to a well-known entertainment giant pitching his huge idea, only to be quickly rejected. He also contacts a manager to represent him, but again he is quickly rejected again. Not one to give up easily, Sean tries something else, something a bit unusual. He comes up with a way to be represented by someone called Dan Welch. But when Dan Welch contacts one of the companies Sean has previously been rejected by, Dan tells them Sean has a great idea for a movie, which Sean actually doesn’t have. The person in charge of acquiring new scripts ideas says she would love to hear Sean’s movie idea. Although Sean is grateful he now has an opportunity to talk to someone in LA, he has to come up with a really great idea for a movie. And, he does, and the big entertainment company wants to buy it. But of course, there are complications. And, there are lots of side plots to keep the story moving along.

In the process of telling a good story, author Jeff Baron throws in lots of movie industry buzz words such as options, screen plays, production rights, first writer, publishing rights, etc., educating, as well as entertaining, the reader.

Baron has been involved in the entertainment industry for many years, fulfilling such roles as screenwriter, director, playwright, speechwriter and marketing director. This is his first foray into the business of writing books. If this first book is a hit, and I believe it will be, he has left the ending wide open for at least one sequel (if not more) to follow.

Reviewed by Christine M. Irvin on March 18, 2013

I Represent Sean Rosen
by Jeff Baron