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Lady Lollipop

Review

Lady Lollipop

written by Dick King-Smith, illustrated by Jill Barton

Some children are lucky enough to have everything. Soon-to-be eight-year-old Penelope is just such a child. She is a princess after all and is given everything and anything she wants. You would think that she would be happy and content. But unfortunately, being spoiled rotten all of her life, Penelope is a bad-tempered and horrid little girl. After much pouting and foot stomping, Penelope decides that she wants her much-bullied royal father to give her a pig for her eighth birthday.

What Princess Penelope ends up with is a very intelligent pig called Lollipop and an even more intelligent pig trainer and pig keeper named Johnny. It isn’t long before Johnny is training more than just the pig. For Lollipop there is something very special about the pig, as one by one, the princess, then the king and finally the queen all look into the pig’s sweet face and see "those eyes, fringed with long white lashes and shining with intelligence" and what they see is "someone not so different from (themselves) looking back" at them. Johnny’s planning, along with Lollipop’s cleverness and willingness to help, turns what could be a disaster into a success story.

With his usual humor, evident love and understanding of pigs, and delightful storyline, Dick King-Smith has created yet another wonderful pig hero for us to enjoy. This chapter book is illustrated throughout in Jill Barton’s signature black-and-white illustrations that bring Lollipop and the human characters in this story to life so beautifully and, in many cases, so amusingly. A joy to read and re-read, this is the first book in a series about Lollipop.

Reviewed by Marya Jansen-Gruber on July 14, 2003

Lady Lollipop
written by Dick King-Smith, illustrated by Jill Barton

  • Publication Date: July 14, 2003
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick
  • ISBN-10: 0763621811
  • ISBN-13: 9780763621810