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History's Worst

Series

History's Worst

Get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of what it takes to be considered one of the worst figures in history, with this brand-new nonfiction series that focuses on the most nefarious historical figures.

History's Worst

Books in this series

by Michael Burgan - Children's 8-12, Children's Nonfiction, History
In 1888, London was terrorized by a mysterious man with a knife. Between the end of August and beginning of November, this man committed five known murders --- possibly more. Then, just as suddenly as they started, the killings stopped. Dubbed “Jack the Ripper” by the press, he slipped through the dark, foggy streets of London’s Whitchapel district, targeting women and leaving no witnesses and no clues as to his identity. The police were stumped. The press went wild. But no one could find Jack the Ripper.
by James Buckley, Jr. - Biography, Children's 8-12, Children's Nonfiction, History, Holocaust
On a list of the worst people ever, Adolf Hitler is certainly at or near the top. Born the son of a low-ranking government official, no one would have predicted that the young Adolf would grow up and become the leader of millions of Germans as well as one of the most despised figures of the twentieth century. When Hitler entered politics, he found himself surrounded by people who agreed with him. Who would listen to his rants and would happily follow his every decree and cheer his every word. But why did people let him do that? Why did they follow him? And what made Adolf Hitler so popular?
by James Buckley - Children's, Children's 8-12, Crime, History, Nonfiction
Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are possibly the most famous and most romanticized criminals in American history. When the police found photos of them posing with guns and goofing around, they became media darlings. However, their fame was short-lived, and their lives would end in a violent police ambush. There is no question that their story continues to fascinate writers, musicians, visual artists and filmmakers. But is that fascination justified? Or are we confusing the movie images with reality and ignoring the ugly truth of their story?
by Michael Burgan - Biography, Children's, Children's 8-12, Children's Nonfiction, History, Nonfiction

On August 4, 1892, the murders of wealthy and prominent Andrew and Abby Borden rocked the small town of Fall River, Massachusetts. The accused? Mild-mannered and highly respected Lizzie Borden, daughter of Andrew and stepdaughter of Abby. But did she actually do it? And if she did, why? On August 11, Lizzie was arrested. But after a sensational trial, she was found not guilty. Rumors lingered. Stories persisted. And Lizzie continues to fascinate even today.