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Standing Up Against Hate: How Black Women in the Army Helped Change the Course of WWII

Review

Standing Up Against Hate: How Black Women in the Army Helped Change the Course of WWII

In her newest book, STANDING UP AGAINST HATE: How Black Women in the Army Helped Change the Course of World War II, author Mary Cronk Farrell gives young readers an intimate look at what life was like for the young black women who served during WWII. Charity Adams became the highest-ranking African American woman in the military when WWII ended. She also commanded the only black WAAC (Women's Army Auxialary Corp) battalion. She, and other women liked her, played a crucial but often forgotten, role in the war.

"This book would make a great edition to any history unit about WWII, particularly in regards to women who served in the military."

These brave women were subjected to racial prejudice, especially in the South, even though they were part of the country’s military forces. They were often given menial jobs, just because they were women and they were black. But, the majority of those who enlisted stayed the course, stood up against the hate and some, like Charity Adams, rose up the ranks of enlisted personnel.

Farrell writes with an informative and engaging style. She adds lots of photos and other material, such as copies of newspaper clippings from the era, to enhance her text. Extra pages at the end of the book include an Author’s Note, a Glossary of some terms used in the text, a Timeline of events of WWII, an extensive list of Notes for each chapter as well as a Bibliography.

This book would make a great edition to any history unit about WWII, particularly in regards to women who served in the military. 

Reviewed by Christine M. Irvin on February 26, 2019

Standing Up Against Hate: How Black Women in the Army Helped Change the Course of WWII
by Mary Cronk Farrell