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The Dream Bearer

Review

The Dream Bearer

Lots of things in David's quiet Harlem life are changing, and he's not sure what to make of it. He has sort of gotten used to his father Reuben's odd behavior, but his brother Tyrone is starting to act strangely as well. Tyrone goes out for hours at a time and won't tell anyone where he is. When the police raid the family's home at two in the morning looking for Tyrone, David realizes his brother is not the person he thought he was.

To complicate matters further, David's mother is involved in the fight to build a neighborhood homeless shelter, there's a new family with a girl David's age, and David's teachers are trying to talk him into transferring to the private school where he's been accepted. The biggest change in David's life, though, is the appearance of Mr. Moses, a man who claims to be over three hundred years old and has the task of passing dreams through generations. Mr. Moses, through his fantastic stories and dreams, helps David and Reuben understand each other.

Moving and elegant, like listening to Billie Holiday's music, THE DREAM BEARER is a book that would be boring had it not been written by the brilliant Walter Dean Myers. Everyone in David's neighborhood is tangible and real, and while life in Harlem on 145th Street is not always beautiful, it is always wise. All of the characters sparkle against the urban background, emphasizing the different facets of family, community, friendship, and understanding. If you aren't already familiar with Myers's brand of intelligence and quiet, thoughtful observations on life in poor neighborhoods, this book is a great place to start.

Reviewed by Carlie Kraft on June 1, 2003

The Dream Bearer
by Walter Dean Myers

  • Publication Date: June 1, 2003
  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Amistad
  • ISBN-10: 006029521X
  • ISBN-13: 9780060295219